Tag Archives: science

Science and comic book science fiction covers

Once again, a mix of visuals and interesting links.

A thought experiment suggests at least one of quantum mechanics’ principles (the theory is universal; it’s consistent; and two contradictory facts cannot both be true) are wrong.

How the right wing came to embrace the anti-vaxxer movement. Oh, and Russia helped.

“Someone I was dating asked me if I could reschedule my period so it didn’t coincide with his birthday.” A look at things too many men don’t know about women’s bodies.

How worried should we be about facial recognition software?

Andrew Wiles cracked Fermat’s last theorem. He almost blew it.

Researchers look at black genes to explain racial differences when they should be focused on black lives.

IP mapping and its discontents. An article at Citylab argues this is one reason why print maps are still useful.

“Most people struggle with the idea that medicine is all about probability.” A look at why a lot of what doctors do to treat us doesn’t make a difference.

#SFWApro. All covers by Gil Kane, rights to covers remain with current holder.

 

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Science and science fiction covers

Once again, a mix of science links with DC science fiction comics covers.

The many worlds theory of quantum mechanics says every quantum action creates a new universe. Philip Ball sees some problems with this. Researcher Heinrich Pas argues that all these universes are just faces of an underlying quantum reality.

Turns out blockchains aren’t unhackable.

The struggle to preserve Stonehenge.

Forensic science is more fallible than we think. And facial recognition systems in China labeled a woman as a jaywalker after seeing her photo on the side of a bus.

Why so many new transportation ideas founder because of tunnels.

Blogs and media threw a lot of attention at a study that claimed women had better orgasms with rich men. The later retraction by the authors? Not so much coverage.

Could elephants qualify for personhood?

Paleontologists claim to have discovered a major site that captures the day the dinosaurs died. National Geographic on what it means and why there are skeptics.

#SFWApro. All rights to covers remain with current holders. Covers top to bottom by J. Winslow Mortimer, Gil Kane, Murphy Anderson, Murphy Anderson, Anderson again and Gil Kane.

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Real science links and DC Weird Science covers

As I’m getting reorganized after Mysticon a simple links and  images post:

Hand transplant surgeons say they’re so routine now that they should be covered by insurance. Not everyone agrees.

A biologist discusses his feelings after an AI outperformed him. Another researcher says scientists using AI for data analysis are doing it wrong.

How much of the Internet is fake?

Flying cop cars!

A scientist offers revolutionary evidence that heart cells can regenerate. Years later, the results turn out to be bogus. The unsettling thing for me is that even though good science requires replicating results, repeated failures by other labs to confirm the findings didn’t seem to matter (one doctor dismissed the researchers as simply not being good enough to make regeneration work).

And despite the FBI’s claims, the science behind its photo analysis evidence looks dubious too.

#SFWApro. Covers (top to bottom) by Gil Kane, Ruben Moreira, Murphy Anderson and Anderson again, then Ruben Moreira. All rights to images remain with current holder.

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Let’s science! SF covers and science links

Images and links have no relation to each other, in case you were wondering.

(Art by Schinella)

A prominent lab generated multiple research studies whose conclusions (kids will eat fruit if you just put a sticker of Elmo on it!) went viral. It appears they got the results by fudging data a lot.

The Stanford prison experiment showed that people given the power to abuse others will use it. Except it doesn’t hold up.

(Art uncredited)

Companies are embedding microchips in employees. With their consent, so far anyway.

(Earl Bergey)

How much does culture affect psychology?

(Uncredited)

Private space launches are now competing for aerospace with plane flights.

Meet the tardigrates, Earth’s most indestructible animal.

(Powers)

Lots of information now lies in programs so old they’re no longer readable, or on CD-Roms. Researchers hope to develop a universal virtual computer that can read them.

Rich people’s interest in the future of technology? Surviving while the world dies.

#SFWApro. All rights to images remain with current holder.

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