Woman as hostage, as engineer, as office drone, as widow: movies and TV

REAL TIME: Siege at Lucas Street Market (2001) has a convenience-store robbery turn into a hostage crisis thanks to the idiocy of the two stick-up artists; can pregnant Brinke Stevens find a way to keep herself and her fellow hostages alive? Written and directed by Max Allan Collins, who says he wanted to do a found-footage crime thriller film rather than horror (we see everything unfold in real time via the security cameras) and that Stevens’s character is more-or-less his comic-book female PI Ms. Tree (he was concerned using the real Ms. Tree would undercut the cinema verité feel, and might also hurt the money he and co-creator Terry Beatty earned from studios occasionally optioning the character). A good, low-budget thriller. “I don’t have a purse — I came here to shoplift.”

I wasn’t a fan of the two recent Atlas Shrugged movies and apparently neither was anyone else: ATLAS SHRUGGED III: Who is John Galt? (2014) went straight to video, recast everyone and only ran 90 minutes, which mercifully reduces the amount of speechifying. Protagonist Dagny Taggart having reached Galt’s Gulch at the end of II, she gets to hear lots of lectures on the virtue of selfishness and fall in love with John Galt. Back in the regular world, society continues sliding into an unconvincing dystopia (it’s not much worse than the standard media view of New York in the 1970s). And the film is still clueless about how the world works, for examples portraying the trans-continental railroad as a pure capitalist project with no government support (a myth that cropped up in the earlier films). Glenn Beck plays a talking head awestruck by Galt’s visionary speech (which is way shorter than the book). “At last someone had the courage to say the truth and to say it the way it must be said!”

I will give the creators credit, the second season of AGGRETSUKO didn’t simply replay Retsuko’s struggles from S1. Here she’s dealing with her mom’s attempts to fix her up, her desire to find direction in her life, an entitled millennial underling — and if not a happy ending to the season, Retsuko does at least come to accept the good stuff in her life. I’ll be back if there’s an S3, but this works as a stopping point. “It doesn’t matter whether you believe you’re worthy of love — what matters is whether he does.”

I caught the first season of MARLEY’S GHOSTS on the Britbox streaming service and quite enjoyed it; that it was only three episodes didn’t hurt, as I don’t think the premise would work if drawn out. Sarah Alexander plays Marley, who’s stuck seeing dead people, specifically her selfish, unemployed schmuck of a husband, then her boyfriend, then the town’s clueless vicar. The shticks are familiar (like the neighbor across the street wondering why Marley’s talking to herself all the time), but the show and the cast makes them work. “Oh, wait the story’s not from the Book of Luke, it’s from that book of Joan Collins’ — that makes much more sense!”

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