Wonder Woman: The First Decade

Unsurprisingly Ms. magazine’s staff were big fans of Wonder Woman. Hence this 1972 Wonder Woman anthology being identified on the inside as a “Ms. Book,” and opening with an essay from Gloria Steinem (one of the better known feminists of the Bronze Age) discussing her own love for the book and the presence of female role models other than The Girlfriend (not just WW but Queen Hippolyta and the other Amazons). There’s also a good essay by Phyllis Chesler on the history of the Amazon legend.

Just to put this in perspective, in the early Bronze Age there were few resources for reading Golden Age stories. No TPB archives. No digital collections. Either you found a comic shop that had Golden Age material for sale and ponied up, or you read whatever reprints DC occasionally offered (the same is true of Marvel, but as their glory days were the Silver Age, that was most of their reprints until the 21st century). So that made this collection that much more interesting.

After the first couple of stories introducing the Amazons and bringing Wonder Woman to America (which I already have reprints of), the book breaks down into several categories:

Sisterhood. Stories of the Amazing Amazon empowering women: defeating Dr. Psycho’s misogynist propaganda, helping his wife when she’s enmeshed in another bad guy’s schemes. And rebutting the claims of sexists that women have no place outside the home.

Politics. As John Trumbull recently pointed out at Atomic Junkshop, comics have always had a political element. The first story in this section, for instance, has an American town threatened by post-WW II homegrown fascists. The next two stories are much weaker and The Five Tasks of Thomas Tighe seems it would fit better under Sisterhood (to win needed funds for their college, Etta Candy and her sorority sisters have to accomplish a misogynist’s five impossible missions).

Romance. Here it’s two out of three. The first story involves a crime ring giving Steve superpowers in the belief he’ll overawe Wonder Woman, marry her and turn her into an ordinary housewife. Diana, however, decides she can’t accept a man who’s stronger than she is, so Steve gives up his new powers on the spot. The next story is a more conventional romantic rivalry and the last one (by Robert Kanigher) is just sexist (Diana falls for a disguised bad guy, Steve ends up saving her). Of course, as Marston biographer Jill Lepore has pointed out, a lot of the non-Marston stories were more sexist, so it’s a fair representation of the era.

Overall, though, it’s a good collection, worth reading if you like this era of the Amazing Amazon — though now you can find most of these stories in several more recent collections from DC.

WW image by Harry G. Peters, all rights to cover remain with current holder. #SFWApro

5 Comments

Filed under Comics, Reading, Wonder Woman

5 responses to “Wonder Woman: The First Decade

  1. Also, Ms. Magazine has run two covers since then celebrating WW–one in 2012 (that i was published in) and one last year.

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